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Is Recharging Batteries In A Freezer Possible? 

 September 19, 2021

By  Phil Borges

Batteries are a necessary part of our everyday lives. Whether it is for your remote control, TV, or even your electric toothbrush, batteries are an essential power source that is often taken for granted.

But what if you found out that the battery manufacturers have been lying to us? What if we could recharge old batteries by putting them in the freezer?

Continue reading the answers to some frequently asked questions and find out if recharging the battery in the fridge is possible at all.

Can you recharge batteries in the freezer?

Is it possible to recharge a battery inside the fridge? A silly question has been on some people's minds they may be wondering about for years.

The answer is no. You cannot recharge a battery in the fridge. The cold temperatures inside your fridge are too low to provide any energy that could be used to recharge batteries.

But, freezing batteries is a common practice for some people looking to save money on their electric bills. How is this possible?

It sounds like a strange idea, but storing your battery in the freezer could help somehow. You might have heard of this trick before and are wondering if it works.

Freezing batteries will help them maintain their charge for some time. By placing your battery in the freezer, you are not doing anything to help it charge. If your battery is at 85% charged and place in a fridge for several hours, it will only keep its charge level steady when you take it out.

It seems that no matter how much we learn about batteries, there are always new tricks to try out that could make our lives easier or improve performance.

On the other hand, there are always consequences to every action that we must be aware of.

It is important to know what you can and cannot do with your batteries. Freezing them is an example of something that should be avoided since it could damage the cells in a battery if exposed to too much cold temperature.

You will only lower the battery's temperature below the recommended due point. The batteries in freezer will stay dry at this point, but bringing it out of the fridge will cause condensation, which is terrible because you will get corrosion and mess up your battery entirely.

In general, freezing batteries is not recommended at all. Doing this reduces its capacity, and it will be less powerful when you take it out. This is very similar to letting your car sit in the parking lot for too long without starting or driving it, where you will find a hard time starting it up the next time you want to use it.

To avoid this problem, do not freeze your batteries in the first place. If you have a battery that is getting old, make sure you replace them with new ones now and then so they do not lose their charge or power too quickly.

If the freezer can hold the charge of a battery, how long will it last?

A battery that has been frozen will be able to hold its charge but not for too long, or it will depend on how often you use your devices. But then again, freezing the battery will cause damage to it at some point. It is also one good point to know that the idea of freezing batteries is not suitable for all kinds of batteries. So be very careful whether or not to freeze your battery.

What batteries can we store in the fridge?

There are a few types of batteries that can be stored in the freezer. These are NiCD, NiMH, and Alkaline batteries. Not all cells are suitable to be frozen, and some damage or harm when freezing may occur, but it’s worth a shot!

Freeze, replace, or revive dead batteries?

Freezing a dead battery will not help and will not get the charge it needs at all.

Replacing a dead battery could be a viable solution if you have the time to do it. The benefits of replacement are the battery can be revitalized and will once again provide energy for your needs, or at least as long as its charge lasts.

Reviving dead batteries is another option to consider, but this does not always work out in the end. The most common method is called the Jump Start Method for dead car batteries, for example. You will then need another car and jumper cables to get it started.

Always remember that dead batteries should not be thrown away immediately. These should be sent to a recycling center where they can be disposed of properly.

What is the difference between a rechargeable battery to a disposable battery?

To further explain their differences, here are some points each:

Rechargeable Batteries:

  • Rechargeable batteries can hold a charge longer than disposable batteries.
  • Rechargeable battery's power fades over time when you use them and will need a recharged. Sometimes the rechargeables are worth buying because they can save money in the long run if it is not used too often.
  • Rechargeable cells are capable of high current pulses, which is why they can be used to power some portable electronics such as laptops and cell phones.
  • Rechargeable batteries come in handy as their ability to produce large amounts of electrical energy makes them perfect backup devices when your regular battery dies on you.

Disposable Batteries:

  • Disposable batteries only last for about 12 hours (or a shorter time to some) and need to be replaced.
  • They are also generally cheaper than rechargeable batteries but eventually become more expensive if you use them often as you need to purchase more depending on use.
  • These batteries cannot hold a charge over the span of months, and they should only be used when required to do so.

Conclusion

We hope that the guides above have helped you better understand how batteries work and how they should, including what steps you can take to keep them running smoothly and efficiently and prolong their lifespan.

About the author

Hi, I'm Phil Borges.. thanks for reading.. My wife says I can't shut up about batteries so to save my marriage I've started this blog .. where I'd be ranting about batteries! Please leave a comment if you have any questions, I'm happy to help!

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